Timeline: Early Modern period

 1 mya      Prehistory      54 BCE

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 54 BCE      Roman occupation     410 CE

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     410 CE      Anglo-Saxon era       1066 CE

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 1066 CE     Norman period     1299 CE

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  1300 CE    Late Middle Ages     1499 CE

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1500 CE     Early Modern era     1799 CE

2018_nave_surveying

1504 John Fisher is appointed Bishop of Rochester. He figured in the anti-Lutheran policies of King Henry VIII.
1535 Fisher remained true to Rome and for his defence of the Pope was elevated as a cardinal in May. King Henry was angered by these moves and, on 22 June, Cardinal Fisher was beheaded on Tower Green.
1540 Henry VIII visited Rochester on 1 January when he met Ann of Cleves for the first time and was “greatly disappointed”. Whether connected or not, the old Priory of St Andrew was dissolved by royal command later in the year, one of the last monasteries to be dissolved.
The English Reformation. 1542 A new foundation of a Dean and six Canons was established and the cathedral dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary.
1547 Nicholas Ridley was consecrated Bishop of Rochester. During his time at Rochester he directed that the altars in the churches of his diocese should be removed and tables put in their place to celebrate the Lord’s Supper.
1548 Bishop Nicholas Ridley helps Thomas Cranmer compile the Book of Common Prayer. In 1550 he was translated to London.
Nicholas Ridley is involved in the plot to place Lady Jane Grey on the throne in preference to the Roman Catholic Queen Mary. The plot failed and Ridley was burnt at the stake for treason on 16 October 1555. 1553
1573 Queen Elizabeth I stays in Rochester for four days, attending divine service in the cathedral on 19 September.
1606 James I & VI and his brother-in-law, Christian IV of Denmark, visited the city, accompanied by his family (Queen Anne and Prince Henry). King James was accommodated at the bishop’s palace and the whole party attended a Sunday service at the cathedral led by Bishop Barlow.
1633 Archbishop Laud visited the cathedral and complained about its general state, in particular that it “suffered much for want of glass in the windows”.
1634 The defects pointed out by Archbishop Laud had been mainly remedied (apart from some of the glass), the excuse being that the backlog had built up due to money (£1,000) being spent on “making of the organs”. Laud accepted this and required completion, noting among other items that the bells and their frame needed to be put into good order
1635 The cathedral is described as: “small and plaine, yet it is very lightsome and pleasant: her [the cathedral’s] quire is neatly adorn’d with many small pillars of marble; her organs though small yet are they rich and neat; her quiristers though but few, yet orderly and decent.” The author then describes the various monuments “divers others also of antiquity, so dismembred, defac’d and abused”.
The English Civil War breaks out. 1642 The cathedral was damaged by Cromwell’s soldiers.
1664 The south nave aisle is recased, an inscription high in the wall records the date.
1670 Most of the north wall of the north nave aisle is rebuilt.
1705 Work started to relead the roof, completed by 1724.
1730 The old ringers’ loft above the quire steps was removed and the crossing vaulted.
1742 Major work was undertaken in the quire, sufficiently disruptive that the dean and chapter used nearby St Nicholas’ Church until 1743.
1749 The steeple is rebuilt
1751 The cathedral’s south quire aisle and transept are giving cause for concern, so they were buttressed, the roof lightened and supporting brickwork placed in the crypt.
1765 The west front towers are rebuilt, the work lasts until 1772.
1791 A new organ is completed.

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1800 CE      Late Modern era     2018 CE